Issue 4

December 2007
Articles: 

ADVANCES IN LOGISTICS AND THE GROWTH OF INTRA-FIRM TRADE: THE CASE OF CANADIAN AFFILIATES OF U.S. MULTINATIONALS, 1984–1995

Intra-firm trade in intermediates between U.S. multinational parents (MNCs) and their Canadian manufacturing affiliates increased dramatically in the 1984–1995 period (i.e., it roughly doubled).

COMPETITION AND COST OVERRUNS IN PROCUREMENT

Most cases of cost overruns in public procurement are related to important changes in the initial project design.

DO OLIGOPOLISTS POLLUTE LESS? EVIDENCE FROM A RESTRUCTURED ELECTRICITY MARKET

Electricity restructuring has created the opportunity for producers to exercise market power. Oligopolists increase price by distorting output decisions, causing cross-firm production inefficiencies.

IS THE GENERAL PUBLIC LICENCE A RATIONAL CHOICE?

Open source projects are networks of developers, distributors and end-users of non-proprietary created knowledge goods.

BESTSELLER LISTS AND PRODUCT VARIETY

This paper uses detailed weekly data on sales of hardcover fiction books to evaluate the impact of the New York Times bestseller list on sales and product variety.

THE EFFECT OF GROUP SIZE AND ASYMMETRIES ON THE INCENTIVE TO REVEAL GROUP-SPECIFIC INFORMATION

In this paper, I examine how firms' incentives to differentiate their products through the revelation of truthful information about product attributes varies with the distribution of consumer preferen

Notes: 

DIRECT TO CONSUMER ADVERTISING AND PRESCRIPTION CHOICE

Toshiaki Iizuka and Ginger Z. Jin

This paper examines the effect of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs on doctors' choice of drug brands.

VERTICAL INTEGRATION AND SHARED FACILITIES IN UNREGULATED INDUSTRIES

Felipe Balmaceda and Eduardo Saavedra

In this paper we analyze the equilibrium market structure, following liberalization, of an industry involving an essential facility.

PATENT LENGTH AND THE TIMING OF INNOVATIVE ACTIVITY

JOSHUA S. GANS and STEPHEN P. KING

The standard result in patent policy, as demonstrated by Gilbert and Shapiro (1990), is that infinitely lived but very narrow patents are optimal as deadweight losses are minimised and spread through