Issue 4

December 2009
Articles: 

THE IMPACT OF ACADEMIC PATENTING ON THE RATE, QUALITY AND DIRECTION OF (PUBLIC) RESEARCH OUTPUT

We examine the influence of faculty patenting on the rate, quality, and content of public research outputs in a panel dataset of 3,862 academic life scientists.

CUT-THROAT FRINGE COMPETITION IN AN EMERGING COUNTRY MARKET: TAX EVASION OR THE ABSENCE OF MARKET POWER?

Brazil's established soft-drink firms recently lost ground to multiple low-price entrants, with small-scale operations and minimal advertising.

THE ROLE OF SUNK COSTS IN THE DECISION TO INVEST IN R&D

We present a dynamic empirical model of a firm's R&D decisions that is consistent with the existence of sunk R&D costs, taking into account that these costs may differ between small and large

DOES THE EFFECT OF PUBLIC SUPPORT FOR R&D DEPEND ON THE DEGREE OF APPROPRIABILITY?

We explore the interaction between public support for R&D and appropriability using a dataset constructed from the Spanish Community Innovation Survey, for the period 2000–2005.

COLLUSION AND RESEARCH JOINT VENTURES

I examine the question whether cooperation in R&D among firms producing similar products leads to product market collusion.

ON THE ANTICOMPETITIVE EFFECT OF EXCLUSIVE DEALING WHEN ENTRY BY MERGER IS POSSIBLE

We extend the literature on exclusive dealing by allowing the incumbent and the potential entrant to merge. This uncovers new effects.

VERTICAL MERGERS AND PRODUCT DIFFERENTIATION

This paper presents an equilibrium theory of vertical mergers that incorporates strategic behaviors in the Hotelling-type location model.

OPTIMAL AUCTIONS WHEN A SELLER IS BOUND TO SELL TO COLLUSIVE BIDDERS

I consider optimal auctions for a seller who is bound to sell a single item to one of two potential buyers, organized in a ‘well-coordinated’ cartel.

THE INFLUENCE OF ECONOMICS ARTICLES ON BUSINESS RESEARCH: ANALYSIS OF JOURNALS AND TIME TRENDS

This article examines the influence of economics on business research using citation data. The share of economics in citations from business is 10.78% until 1995, but only 6.95% for 1996–2003.